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Informal Economy Topic(s): Policies & Programmes in the Informal Economy

Waste Picker Video Series: Chronicle of a Fight for Inclusion

About the Series

(Text in Spanish follows the English version)

Policies & Programmes

Ahmedabad incense stick rollerInformal employment is a widespread feature of today’s global economy. On average, informal workers have lower earnings and face higher risks than formal workers. Policies should seek to increase the earnings and reduce the risks of the working poor in the informal economy.

Home-Based Workers' Policies in Pakistan

Sindh Province Finalizes Policy

KARACHI, Sept 3: The Sindh government has prepared a final draft to legalise the rights of the home-based workers (HBWs), declaring them a ‘special category’ of workers, distinct from domestic workers. Read more.

Durban/eThekwini, South Africa Informal Economy Policy

In the 1990s, the city of Durban/eThekwini in South Africa established a department dedicated to street trader management and support and allocated resources to infrastructure development for traders.

Social & Legal Protection for the Informal Workforce

In development policy circles, two types of state protection for the informal workforce – especially the working poor – are actively under consideration: social protection and legal rights.

Labour Law and Informal Workers: The WIEGO Perspective

Historically, around the world, the “employment relationship” has represented the cornerstone – the central legal concept – around which labour law and collective bargaining agreements have sought to recognize and protect the rights of workers.

Policies & Programmes for Household Enterprises in Africa

In 2008, the World Bank Africa Region launched a three-year cross-country study on Improving the Productivity and Reducing Risk of Household Enterprises. One objective of this study was to highlight the scale and persistence of self-employment and economic activities based in the household rather than “firms,” even in economies with strong growth both overall and in wage employment (which remains too small to absorb a substantial share of new entrants in most developing countries).

Typology of Social Protection Programmes

Social Security – The term is commonly used to refer to government programmes designed to provide for the basic economic security and welfare of individuals and their dependents. The programmes classified under the term social security differ from one country to another, but all are the result of government legislation and all are designed to provide some kind of monetary payment to defray a loss of or a deficiency in income, and/or to assist individuals to build their own security mechanisms for their futures.